Notable Designs

SAF is dedicated to increasing awareness of the Sarasota School of Architecture movement, helping to preserve or rehabilitate its irreplaceable buildings and demonstrating its relevance to the contemporary built environment.
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Cocoon House

Cocoon House

Officially known as the Healy Guest House, the Cocoon House was constructed in 1950 by the partnership of Ralph Twitchell and Paul Rudolph.

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Hiss Studio, Architect: Edward "Tim" Siebert

Hiss Studio

A glass box raised on fourteen slender steel columns, this design is an elegant example of the International style.

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Walker Guest House, Architect: Paul Rudolph, Photo: Ezra Stoller

Walker Guest House

This project was Paul Rudolph’s first after breaking his partnership with Ralph Twitchell in 1952. Because of its spatial efficiency and environmental features, it is one of the most exemplary structures of the “Sarasota School.”

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Umbrella House, Architect: Paul Rudolph, Photo: Anton Grassl

Umbrella House

Built as a speculative house for the contemporary development Lido Shores to attract attention from the road, the Umbrella House measures about 2,000 square feet…

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Cohen Residence, Architect: Paul Rudolph

Cohen Residence

The house was built in 1955 for former City of Sarasota Mayor David Cohen and his wife, Eleene, is a classic example of the Sarasota School of Architecture movement, with glass walls that open completely to the elements.

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DeVries/Craig Residence, Architect: Edward "Tim" Siebert

DeVries/Craig Residence

The Craig Residence is located in the Lido Shores neighborhood, an area of the city now recognized for offering a high concentration of architecture associated with the “Sarasota School.”

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Martin Harkavy House, Architect: Paul Rudolph

Martin Harkavy House

With broad overhangs, thin framing, delicate screens, and open carport, the original house seems both light and monumental. A two-story glass living room at the rear opens to a private garden.

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Deering Residence, Architect: Paul Rudolph, Photo: Ezra Stoller

Deering Residence

Constructed primarily of stacked lime blocks and exposed cypress, this two-bedroom beach house is an exercise in spatial complexity and the blending of inside with outside.

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Burkhardt Residence, Architect: Paul Rudolph, Photo: Emily Cain

Burkhardt Residence

Rudolph planned this house as two units – one public and one private, which are connected by an 22-ft x 40-ft open-air living room with 12-ft-tall ceilings, full-height glass and a skylight that runs its entire 40-ft length.

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Sarasota High School Addition

SHS Rudolph Canopies

Further to its efforts with the School Board of Sarasota County on the renovation of Paul Rudolph’s 1960 Sarasota High School, in 2018, SAF, in partnership with the Sarasota Art Museum, worked to dedicate the concrete canopies…

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Sarasota High School Addition

Sarasota High School

A successor to Rudolph’s Riverview High School also in Sarasota (built 1958, demolished 2009), Sarasota High School is the equivalent of all the principles that Paul Rudolph developed…

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Leech Studio, "The Round House", Architect: Jack West

Leech Studio (“The Round House”)

Hilton and Dorothy Leech were prominent local painters who also conducted a painting school from their home. In 1959, they acquired property on Phillippi Creek and commissioned Jack West and Elizabeth Boylston Waters to design a school building for $20,000.

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Plymouth Harbor, Architect: Frank Folsom Smith and Louis F. Schneider, Photo: Sarasota Magazine

Plymouth Harbor

At the time this structure was built, it was the tallest in Sarasota, and according to lead architect Frank Folsom Smith, it prompted the City of Sarasota to limit the height of buildings to 25 stories.

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Chapell- Lifeso House, Architect: Donald C. Chapell

Chapell-Lifeso House

This home features soaring light-filled spaces for large family living quarters on one side, a complete architect’s design studio on the other, and a private courtyard in the middle.

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News about Notable Designs

Featured Architects and Designs

Revere Quality House
Paul Rudolph
and Ralph Twitchell, 1948
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Revere Quality House
Healy Guest House ("Cocoon House")
Paul Rudolph, 1950
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Hugh Given House
Philip Hanson Hiss, 1951
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Hugh Given House
Hiss Studio
Edward "Tim" Siebert, 1952
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Hiss Studio
Walker Guest House
Paul Rudolph, 1952
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Walker Guest House
Sanderling Beach Club
Paul Rudolph, 1952
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Sanderling Beach Club
Umbrella House
Paul Rudolph, 1953
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Umbrella House
Cohen Residence
Paul Rudolph, 1955
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Cohen Residence
DeVries/Craig Residence
Edward "Tim" Siebert, 1955
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Devries/craig residence
Martin Harkavy House
Paul Rudolph, 1957
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Harkavy House
Deering Residence
Paul Rudolph, 1957
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Deering Residence
Burkhardt Residence
Paul Rudolph, 1957
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Burkhardt Residence
Warm Mineral Springs Inn
Victor Lundy, 1958
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Warm Mineral Springs Inn
Maurice Birk House
Philip Hanson Hiss, 1959
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Maurice Birk House
Mrs. Adelia Dolan House
Philip Hanson Hiss, 1959
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Dolan House
Scott Building
Joseph Farrell
and William Rupp, 1960
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Scott Building
Plymouth Harbor
Frank Folsom Smith
and Louis F. Schneider, 1966
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Plymouth Harbor
St. Paul Lutheran Church Fellowship Hall
Victor Lundy, 1969
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Fellowship Hall
Casa De Cielo
Carl Abbott - 1982
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Casa De Cielo
Saul & Florence Putterman Residence
Carl Abbott, 1986
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Putterman residence
Chapell-Lifeso House
Donald C. Chapell, 2000
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Chapell-Lifeso House
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