Sanderling Beach Club

This complex was Rudolph’s first non-residential project to be constructed after setting up his own practice separately from Ralph Twitchell in 1951.
Sanderling Beach Club, Architect: Paul Rudolph, Photo: Jenny Acheson
Sanderling Beach Club
Photo: Jenny Acheson
Sanderling Beach Club, Architect: Paul Rudolph, Photo: Jenny Acheson
Sanderling Beach Club
Photo: Jenny Acheson
The larger scheme of the development is innovative in that a stretch of beachfront property was developed so that one section contained a common area with access to the water for the rest of the development.
Rudolph’s master plan contained a clubhouse, patio, lookout tower, beach cabanas, tennis courts and a swimming pool. The lookout tower, patio and 10 cabanas (5 either side of patio) were constructed in 1952, and an additional 15 cabanas were added in 1958. Rudolph’s clubhouse, tennis courts and swimming pool designs were never realized.
A 5-bay clubhouse was constructed in 1960 by Sarasota architect John M. Crowell. This was extensively remodeled in 1987 to be more sympathetic with Rudolph’s original design. The lookout tower was dismantled in the 1960s due to structural instability.
The cabanas – rented by residents of the community – are constructed of simple wood framing elements with a roof vault system composed of two layers of plywood. Rudolph said that this roof was reminiscent of the nearby waves, although the idea for such a plywood vault can also be seen in his unbuilt design, with Ralph Twitchell, for the Knott Residence, in Yankeetown, Florida, 1951.
Sanderling Beach Club, Architect: Paul Rudolph, Photo: Jenny Acheson
Sanderling Beach Club
Photo: Jenny Acheson
Sanderling Beach Club, Architect: Paul Rudolph
Sanderling Beach Club
A simple 10’ x 12’ enclosed space (without kitchen or bathroom) is matched with a 10’ x 12’ semi-outdoor patio (roof only), doubling the amount of habitable space. Cabana ceilings are painted in dark blue while the framing and roof edges are painted in white.
The cabanas of The Sanderling Beach Club (but not the clubhouse) were placed on the National Register in 1994.

Architect

Paul Rudolph, 1952

Sanderling Beach Club, Architect: Paul Rudolph
Sanderling Beach Club

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FEATURED ARCHITECTS AND DESIGNS

Revere Quality House
Paul Rudolph
and Ralph Twitchell, 1948
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Revere Quality House
Healy Guest House ("Cocoon House")
Paul Rudolph, 1950
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Hugh Given House
Philip Hanson Hiss, 1951
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Hugh Given House
Hiss Studio
Edward "Tim" Siebert, 1952
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Hiss Studio
Walker Guest House
Paul Rudolph, 1952
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Walker Guest House
Sanderling Beach Club
Paul Rudolph, 1952
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Sanderling Beach Club
Umbrella House
Paul Rudolph, 1953
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Umbrella House
Cohen Residence
Paul Rudolph, 1955
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Cohen Residence
DeVries/Craig Residence
Edward "Tim" Siebert, 1955
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Devries/craig residence
Martin Harkavy House
Paul Rudolph, 1957
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Harkavy House
Deering Residence
Paul Rudolph, 1957
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Deering Residence
Burkhardt Residence
Paul Rudolph, 1957
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Burkhardt Residence
Warm Mineral Springs Inn
Victor Lundy, 1958
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Warm Mineral Springs Inn
Maurice Birk House
Philip Hanson Hiss, 1959
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Maurice Birk House
Mrs. Adelia Dolan House
Philip Hanson Hiss, 1959
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Dolan House
Scott Building
Joseph Farrell
and William Rupp, 1960
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Scott Building
Plymouth Harbor
Frank Folsom Smith
and Louis F. Schneider, 1966
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Plymouth Harbor
St. Paul Lutheran Church Fellowship Hall
Victor Lundy, 1969
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Fellowship Hall
Casa De Cielo
Carl Abbott - 1982
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Casa De Cielo
Saul & Florence Putterman Residence
Carl Abbott, 1986
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Putterman residence
Chapell-Lifeso House
Donald C. Chapell, 2000
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Chapell-Lifeso House
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